Wednesday, June 29, 2016

It's Almost Time to Pho Down

With the Stampede just around the corner, The Calgary Pho Down is nearly here as well. An afternoon of amazing food and beautiful cultural demonstrations, The Pho Down features a wide range of talented Vietnamese artists and performers. The event will also feature the first ever International Avenue Spring Roll eating competition.  And of course a LOT of Pho.

Community Partners for this unique Calgary cultural event include Soul of the City Neighbourhood Grants, the Calgary Foundation, Calgary Economic Development, Royal Bank of Canada, International Avenue's Business Revitalisation Zone and CIES. It is Pho Down's mission to create a sense of pride, a pride in the diversity of our neighbourhood that everyone contributes to the wealth of our communities; Wealth meaning the richness of character and depth of interconnectedness, and empathy we have for each other. Pho Down believes that food has the power to bond us all together. Regardless of one's culture, age, gender, or sexuality, we all eat. And most of us like eating a lot. Pho is delicious. Spring Rolls are delicious. People eating a lot of spring rolls in a very short amount of time is a ridiculous thing to watch.

The Pho Down will take place July 16th on International Avenue at the Albert Park Radisson Community Centre 1310 28 St SE. Performances will start at 11:00 am, followed by the Spring Roll eating competition. Entrance to the event, all its activities and a big bowl of delicious Pho at one of eight amazing Pho restaurants along International Avenue is a donation of your choice, with all proceeds going the Alex Food Centre. You can get your tickets online by clicking here or at the door at the day of the event. Everyone and all ages welcome!  For more details visit their website. 



CIES @ The Calgary Stampede

In collaboration with the Calgary Stampede Community Projects and Development Committee, CIES will be joining the Centre for Newcomers and others in the settlement sector at the Calgary Stampede. The day will include a personalised tour of the Agricultural Barns and activities, the new Indian Village and the Rodeo. The purpose of the tour is for the Calgary Stampede to engage with the settlement sector in welcoming newcomers to Calgary. CIES would like to extend a big stampede thank you to Centre for Newcomers CEO Anila Lee-Yeun for inviting us to join her and CFN for what is sure to be a fun-filled day!

The stampede has always been and continues to be about the community. In March 1912, Guy Weadick arrived in Calgary to pitch a 6-day spectacle titled the “Frontier Day Celebration and Championship.” Weadick, a successful vaudeville performer who had travelled throughout North America and Europe as a trick roper, envisioned a world-class rodeo competition that would celebrate the romance and culture of the “disappearing” Old West. He received support for the event he called the “Stampede” from four prosperous southern Alberta ranchers: A.E. Cross, George Lane, Pat Burns and A.J. McLean, collectively known as the Big Four. First held in September of 1912, the Stampede featured roping and bronc events with competitors from throughout the North American West. Women participated in the saddlebronc and trick riding competitions. Members of the Treaty 7 Nations participated in the events as well. The title of world champion bareback bronc rider went to Tom Three Persons of the Kainai (Blood) Nation who was the first person to stay on Cyclone, the famous horse unbeaten by 129 other riders before Three Persons rode him to a standstill. Despite the rainy weather, the first Stampede drew large crowds and was a success.

Due to the onset of an economic depression followed by the outbreak of the First World War, Weadick’s hopes of making the Stampede an annual event were dashed. But in 1919, the Big Four and Ernie L. Richardson, the Secretary of the Calgary Exhibition, called him back to the city to hold a Victory Stampede that would celebrate peace and the end of the First World War. Once again, the Stampede was a successful rodeo competition and western event.

In 1923, the Stampede joined with the Exhibition holding one event – the Calgary Exhibition and Stampede – in July. This was also the first year of the pancake breakfast, started by Jack Morton offering breakfast to visitors and locals alike from the back of his chuckwagon parked downtown. Within a few years, attendance broke 200,000 and the spectacle continued to grow into the Stampede we enjoy today. It remains a celebration of the Old West out of which Calgary grew and showcases the modern, multicultural and cosmopolitan city it has become. Like the Stampede, Calgary’s past and present are firmly rooted in the traditions of western heritage and values.




source: corporate.calgarystampede.com/

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

WRIP @ CIES

June was Welcome Resources Information Program (WRIP) month at CIES.  The WRIP program helps create a welcoming environment through pre-arrival, on arrival and post-arrival support for newcomers to access vital resources for a smooth settlement and integration process in Calgary.

In participation with the EST Department, the WRIP Department attended a YYC Welcoming Fair at the BMO Centre, Hall B at the Calgary Stampede Grounds this month where over 75 booths were set up, including employers and services available to newcomers.

CIES had a booth set up with banners and marketing materials and provided valuable information and assistance to over 200 newcomers.  Many signed up for the numerous educational opportunities and programs available at CIES. The CIES provided valuable information and assistance to over 200 newcomers and  many signed up for the numerous educational opportunities and programs available at CIES. For more information about the WRIP program give us a call anytime at 403-291-0002. 

Monday, June 27, 2016

Success Unbound - A CIES Productions Short Film

Canada is a great nation — a wonderful place to live, work and raise a family.  And we are not alone in recognising this.  We hear often from quality of life rankings that Canadians have built a prosperous nation, a civil society, one rich in diversity and opportunity, that people of many different cultures call home.  There is no question that our strength and economic prosperity are derived from the combination of what we all have in common and what makes each of us different. This is why people from all over the world line up outside Canada's doors in hopes of building a new life.

Below is the CIES original production Success Unbound. Originally screened at the CIES Annual General Meeting last week, the short film demonstrates why people come to Canada and the success they have worked so hard for since their arrival. Thank you to the clients, staff and volunteers whose participation in the project made this film possible.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Staff and Volunteer Appreciation Day @ CIES

Thursday June 23rd was Staff and Volunteer Appreciation day at CIES. Held at our SE Location in Forest Lawn, it was day that recognised the contributions and hard work of our many volunteers and employees. With rapid expansion and our staff ballooning from 90 to more than 130 employees over the last few months, it was also a great chance for the many people in our fast growing organisation to get to know the new faces that have joined us.

The culmination of a staff survey also resulted in an awards ceremony for a number of categories that included Outside the Box Thinker: someone who comes up with great new ideas and sees a different solutions; Excellence in Humour and Entertainment: someone who keeps morale high and makes people look forward to a day at the office; Behind the Scenes Wonder: someone whose daily management makes everything go smoothly for everyone else; Mr./Ms. Positive: someone who is always upbeat, kind and nice to everyone; Mr./Ms. Best Dressed: someone who dresses great day after day, Frequent Flyer; someone who travels back and forth between both locations to help others and Above and Beyond: someone who goes the extra mile for clients and staff alike.

This annual event represents CIES and its mandate to put people first and is predicated on humanity, happiness and trust. Our Society is built upon these characteristics and our goal is to create a culture of consistent recognition and appreciation among staff and volunteers.  For more photos of the event CLICK HERE.



Thursday, June 23, 2016

Calgary Jobs, Information and Training

Here at CIES we always do our best to stay plugged into the Calgary community. so you can be too. From Day one CIES has always believed that strong community partnerships are the best way to have both a meaningful and sustainable impact on the life of immigrants here in Calgary.  We are affiliated with a number of key organisations throughout the city and this expansive network allows us to stay informed on your behalf. Below is a list of upcoming opportunities for a wide range of skills sets and experience levels to improve your skills, network and submit resumes for employment.Click on the provided posters for more details.

INFORMATION
  • CCIS Cooking Pre-Apprenticeship Training program - acquire skills for a career in the culinary arts!  Attend an Information Session on July 14 at 9:30 a.m.  
SKILL BUILDING
  • No-cost Exam Preparation Study Groups for Internationally Educated Pharmacists starting in July 2016 offered by Directions for Immigrants.
  • Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association (CIWA) is offering the Employment Training program in food service for immigrant women with low language skills.  Free childcare and transportation is provided.  
  • Clear Communication for Business for Internationally Educated Professionals in any occupation in any industry starting July 18th. 

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Community Investors VXIII - Between Friends

The 18th non-profit highlighted in the CIES Community Investors Series is Between Friends. Between Friends is a charitable organisation that has been operating in Calgary & area for over 30 years.  Through their programs, they endeavour to benefit all people and increase the community’s awareness, positive attitudes, and sensitivity towards their fellow citizens with disabilities.

Between Friends was originally established in 1970, as the Pink Pelican Club, by a group of parents seeking social, recreational, and community based activities for their teenagers with disabilities. The Pink Pelican Club rapidly expanded as programs provided a bridge for community participation. In 1982, the organisation obtained registered charitable status and a new name.

Between Friends provides quality social, recreation and self-development opportunities for people with disabilities to connect, grow and belong.They focus on abilities, not disabilities. This allows each person to set their own goals and determine their level of participation.

Many people with disabilities seek social and recreational activities that are fundamental to enriching self-esteem, quality of life, and mental and physical health. Between Friends facilitates programs with these goals in mind while promoting a focus on shared interests over individual differences.

Between Friends offers a variety of programs to children, youth and adults that reduce the barriers of isolation and function as the building blocks of friendship. They provide opportunities that challenge, stimulate and pique the curiosity of our participants.

The positive impact Between Friends has on the lives of individuals with disabilities extends to the greater community and CIES sends its heartfelt thanks for all the work they have done for Calgary for more than 30 years. For more information and details on how you can get involved visit there website. 

Growth and Survival Means Immigration - And Yes Fiscal Conservatism

A new Liberal government has re-emphasised immigration and either altered or outright reversed several immigration policies from the previous Harper regime.  With the UK voting on whether or not to stay in the EU, the recent terrorist attacks Belgium, along with the rise of Donald Trump, the benefit of immigration is being contested in both the United States and Europe. When it comes to Canada however, the data clearly reveals Canada’s economy is almost entirely reliant on immigration for its labour growth.

According to Statistics Canada, as of May 2016 the number of landed immigrants employed in Canada rose by 261,200. That's an increase of 6.6 percent from the previous year. Over the same period of time, jobs held by native Canadians were down 93,300.

From Statistics Canada


This trend is reflective of the dropping prices of commodities (as in Oil here in AB) that in turn channel economic activity away from regions driven by resources with lower immigrant populations, like Calgary, to large urban centres like Toronto and Vancouver with higher concentrations of workers born outside Canada.

It should also be noted that according to Stats Canada, our country is aging faster than most any other industrialised nation, which means native born Canadians are leaving the workforce at faster rates than ever before. By extension, we are are far more dependant on foreign-born employment than the majority of other industrialised nations. A prime example is our country's largest city - where the share of immigrants in Toronto's workforce has been above 50 percent throughout 2016.

The bottom line of such data is that without immigration and the much younger demographic profile that comes with it, Canada will become stagnant as a nation. Immigration is about growth and survival. End of Story. And that's less bleeding-heart Liberalism and more just straight up fiscally sound Conservatism.


From Statistics Canada

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

CIES 2016 AGM @ Fort Calgary

The Calgary Immigrant Educational Society's Annual General Report for the 2015-16 fiscal year is now completed. This will be followed by tonight's CIES annual general meeting (AGM). The purpose of our AGM is to give members a report on our activities and finances from the previous fiscal year, to allow time for members to ask questions, and to elect members of our governing body for the coming year.

This year our AGM will be held at historic Fort Calgary. A nonprofit organisation itself, Fort Calgary is an important part of our community's cultural landscape. Many people might not know however, is that Fort Calgary is also a hub for private functions, providing an authentic historical setting for meaningful events. From Annual general meetings, to corporate visioning sessions to weddings to large-scale rock concerts, all with full-service meeting and banquet facilities, it's among the best places in Calgary to book a function. We are proud to support Fort Calgary and we are all looking forward to gathering and sharing this evening in a place where it all began for our great city.

You can download a copy of this year's AGM Report HERE.


Monday, June 20, 2016

Phodown 2016 - The Performers

The Pho Down is an afternoon of amazing food and beautiful cultural demonstrations, featuring some of Calgary's most talented Vietnamese artists and performers. The event will also feature the first ever International Avenue Spring Roll eating competition.  And of course a LOT of Pho. The Pho Down will take place July 16th on International Avenue at the Albert Park Radisson Community Centre 1310 28 St SE. Performances will start at 11:00 am, followed by the Spring Roll eating competition then Pho will be offered at 8 Vietnamese restaurants on International Avenue - all for a donation of your choice, with all proceeds going the Alex Food Centre. Simply CLICK HERE below to reserve your tickets now.

It is our hope that a positive experience like Pho Down will create a sense of pride, a pride in the diversity of our neighbourhood that everyone contributes to the wealth of our communities. Wealth meaning the richness of character and depth of interconnectedness, and empathy we have for each other. We believe that food has the power to bond us all together. Regardless of one's culture, age, gender, or sexuality, we all eat. And most of us like eating a lot. Pho is delicious. Spring Rolls are delicious. People eating a lot of spring rolls in a very short amount of time is a ridiculous thing to watch. Get your tickets below and come Pho Down and see our performers below!


Anthony Chim: Pho Down Performance Director
Executive Director of Calgary Vietnamese Television Calgary, who has been to 108 countries as a public speaker, performer & MC.








Lucy Mo:
Specialised in Vietnamese country music with traditional background dancers.  Has performed in Calgary and Vancouver in many concerts and special events.



Tony Phan:
First Runner-up of Red FM Idol 2014.  Has performed in Canada and USA as a fast-rising 16-year-old star.







Hong Minh: 
Has performed since a young age of 12 and appeared on Global TV, Canada Day Celebration, Vietnamese Concerts, New Year’s Eve Celebrations, and many special events across Canada, USA,and Mexico.

Tiffany Pham:
Top of the Calgary Vietnamese Golden Voice Contest 2015.  Professional ballroom dancer.  Has performed in Calgary and Vietnam.









Chien Dang:  
Experienced musician, organist/guitarist who has performed all across Canada serving Vietnamese, Chinese, and Canadian communities







Scott Thai:
Specialised in Vietnamese-Chinese songs.  Has performed in Calgary and Edmonton in many concerts and special events.  




For more details visit www.phodown.org


World Refugee Day

Today is World Refugee Day and every year June 20 gives us a chance to focus the world's attention on:

  • the plight of refugees and displaced people around the world
  • the causes of their exile
  • their resolve and will to survive, and
  • how they contribute to Canada.
  • Canada is committed to helping refugees and has one of the largest refugee resettlement programs in the world. 

Developing both an awareness and understanding of the complex nature of the refugee, due to many factors and moving parts, is important toward acknowledging the international community's role in aiding refugees today.  Above all else, it is vital expose the Calgary community to the definition of the term "refugee," which according to international law is specifically someone who is fleeing armed conflict or persecution and has sought refuge across international borders.

The UNHCR puts it plainly: "These are people for whom denial of asylum has potentially deadly consequences."

Misunderstanding the term can have dangerous consequences for refugees, and often gives way to political debate and xenophobia in place of relief during a humanitarian crisis.

In terms of the Syrian refugees, millions are in fact displaced in neighbouring Middle Eastern countries, such as Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan, where massive populations are living in camps near the borders. The daily influx puts incredible strains on these host countries and their resources, especially when it's a relatively small country like Lebanon, which currently has about 1.2 million Syrian refugees, while the country itself only has a population of about 4.5 million. The 25,000 refugees absorbed into 35 million here in Canada pales by comparison.

South Sudan, Yemen, Burundi, and the Central African Republic are all also in  state of humanitarian crisis: emergencies around the world today that threaten millions of refugees. Families and children forced to flee their homes arrive in refugee camps daily with little more than the clothes on their back. As Canada resettles refugees to save lives and provide stability to people fleeing persecution who have no hope of relief CIES will continue to its part and asks everyone to do whatever they can, no matter how big or small, to contribute.




Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Aboriginal Month is About Being Canadian

June is Aboriginal Awareness Month and every June Canadians are invited to celebrate the contributions of Indigenous people, along with their long and storied history in Canada, by taking part in events and festivities.

The visual medium is arguably the most effective way to communicate ideas in today's world and it was at a screening of Elder in the Making @ the ArtBOX on 17E that the videos you see below preceded the headline film. Made by aboriginal youth with the support of Antyx Community Arts, these, amongst several others, touch upon huge issues not just facing aboriginal youth, but Canadian society as a whole. Their concerns are about Canada, about Canadians and the future we will all share.

With Trudeau green-lighting the first phase of inquiry into missing, murdered indigenous women and the reversed attitude his government has shown toward indigenous people and indigenous issues compared to previous governments, there is, at least, a shift in perspective and an opportunity to make changes that will have an impact on our country. As celebrations continue throughout the month, let us work together to make the best future we can for all Canadians, from the first to walk these lands to the latest who arrive on our shores.

On Display @ Pho Down 2016 "Pink Rules"

Pho Down 2016 is almost here, On the last day of the Calgary Stampede, the Pho Down will take place at the Albert Park Radisson Community Centre (1310 28 St SE). Aside from 8 Pho restaurants up and down International avenue all participating and a list of cultural performers, the Pho Down will have a very special guest. Artist Quynh May from Hanoi will be shipping in her powerful and captivating Pink Rules art installation all the way from Vietnam.

In the words of Quynh May, "This exhibition is for those who used to feel, or still feel that they are not deserving enough and not good enough for the rules set by the society, by other people, and even by themselves; so that they can ask themselves this question: how do you truly want to live, if not having to make yourself living mummies?"

Quynh May was born in 1974, Hanoi, Vietnam. She has received many art achievement awards locally and internationally during her adolescent years, with paintings done at the age of six being kept by the Vietnamese Fine Art Museum. Quynh May had grown up under the influence of a retarding education system and the oppression of women in Vietnam, which resulted in many years of her being unrecognised as an artist, working extremely hard as a single-mother to support two children and having to fight her depressive periods alone. These factors have had great contributions to her present work. In 2015, after finding her stand again in the world of fine arts, Quynh May had her very first solo exhibition in the series “Wake up call”. Sculpture installation Pink Rules is the second exhibition project in this series. The installation depicts the oppression and lack of liberty that many people in the world have to live under, especially the women of Vietnam.

For more photos and information on the Pink Rules installation and the rest of Pho Down 2016 simply CLICK HERE. 




Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Canadian Cultural Mosaic Foundation Set to Launch #ICameAsARefugee Campaign

Every day war, execution, and natural disasters force thousands of people to flee their homes. In order to escape, they leave everything behind – all except their hopes and dreams for a better future.

#ICameAsARefugee is a campaign that sheds positive light on refugees and celebrates their contribution to our society. It is a response to anti-refugee feelings. This campaign highlights six different refugees that came to Canada, and tells their stories through their own words.

On June 20th, the Canadian Cultural Mosaic Foundation poster campaign will be launched in downtown Calgary for the first time on World Refugee Day. After the event, the posters will be put across Calgary on various train station platforms, community bulletin boards, and institutions. The posters highlighting each refugee, as well as exclusive video interviews will all be made available to the public on June 20th through our website .

Join in the conversation by sharing the campaign using #ICameAsARefugee to start the movement in ending hate towards asylum seekers and helping to create an understanding and empowerment for refugees. Asylum seekers are also encouraged to share their own stories through the hashtag, or anyone can share the stories of people they know who came as refugees.

Advertising is not cheap. As a 100% non-funded volunteer-led organisation, CCMF  will be raising money to support the poster campaign across Canada. The more money we can raise, the more impact we can have. Everything we raise will go towards buying advertising space so the posters can be put up all over the country. More details to come June 20th!

Calgary Jobs, Information and Training

CIES always does our best to stay plugged into the Calgary community. so you can be too. From Day one CIES has always believed that strong community partnerships are the best way to have both a meaningful and sustainable impact on the life of immigrants here in Calgary.  We are affiliated with a number of key organisations throughout the city and this expansive network allows us to stay informed on your behalf. Below is a list of upcoming opportunities for a wide range of skills sets and experience levels to improve your skills, network and submit resumes for employment. Click on the provided posters for more details.

INFORMATION SESSIONS

  • Join Immigrant Services Calgary for an Information Session. on how to advance your language, education, and career goals.

SKILL BUILDING

  • Clear Communication for Business for Internationally Educated Professionals in any occupation in any industry.
  • Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association (CIWA) is offering free Employment Training program in food service for immigrant women with low language skills.  Free
  • Links to Success – Skills Enhancement & Internship for Young Immigrant Mothers Program offered by CIWA
  • Carpentry Pre-Apprenticeship Training Program offered by Momentum is accepting applications 







CIES Family Tree: Louisa Agapiou

Summer time means good weather, the outdoors, and sunshine. Here at CIES summer also often means practicum students and that said CIES would like to welcome Louisa to our extended family tree. Louisa Agapio recently turned 19 and is entering her second year at the University of Alberta. Currently majoring in Political Science, she hopes to soon be accepted to the Criminology program at the U of A in Edmonton.

Though she resides in Edmonton for the majority of the year, Louisa was born and raised in Calgary and attended Sir Winston Churchill High School,  graduating just last year. During her time in high school, she was a part of the rugby team, the wrestling team, the cross-country team, and the Yearbook Team, amongst others. This summer, she is staying in Calgary with herfamily and was recently accepted as part of the CIES team as a summer student. She will be working with Melissa, our Volunteer and Drop-in ESL Manager, to implement the new curriculum for the Drop-In E.S.L. program.

The daughter of parents who immigrated to Canada, Louisa is a first-generation Canadian and feels working here at CIES is relevant to her prior life experiences. She also has also volunteered in the past teaching ESL and helping low-level literacy children improve their reading skills.

All of us here at CIES welcome her aboard and look forward to working with Louisa throughout the summer! 


Monday, June 13, 2016

Pho Down is Coming Soon

The Pho Down now has a set date and venue and is coming soon. Pho Down is an afternoon of amazing food and beautiful cultural demonstrations, featuring some of Calgary's most talented Vietnamese artists and performers. The event will also feature the first ever International Avenue Spring Roll eating competition.  And of course a LOT of Pho. Entrance to the event, all its activities and of course a big bowl of Pho is a donation of your choice, with all proceeds going the Alex Food Centre. Simply click below to reserve your tickets now.

The Pho Down will take place July 16th on International Avenue at the Albert Park Radisson Community Centre 1310 28 St SE. Performances will start at 11:00 am, followed by the Spring Roll eating competition, then Pho will be offered at 8 Vietnamese restaurants on International Avenue for a donation of your choice.

For more information on the Calgary Cultural Event simply CLICK HERE to visit their website.

Monday, June 6, 2016

CIES Summer Festival August 30th - Around The World in a Day

The CIES 6th Annual Summer Festival is Coming Soon. The theme for last year's festival was Celebrating Diversity and with so many customs and traditions, so much culture and so much diversity all in one place this year the festival theme will be Around The World in a Day. 

CIES would like to thank International Ave's BRZ and the artBOX for once again graciously providing us with an absolutely great venue, and all of us here are busy planning out what should be an amazing day. The day long event will include music, song, dance, food and art from around the world and all is open to the public.  If you or if you know of any individuals or groups that are interested in contributing to the festival please contact shevaughnsmith@immigrant-education.ca as we would love to hear from you... updates coming soon!


Friday, June 3, 2016

Volunteer With CIES

A great way to learn about different cultures and help others is to volunteer with an organisation like CIES. We are currently looking for volunteer teachers for our Drop in ESL program in our SE location.

The benefits of volunteering work both ways and often it is the volunteer who gets more out of donating his or her time and effort. Volunteering means establishing great connections, building your career, and supplies a sense of purpose. Additionally  Psychology Today even claims that those who  regularly volunteer live longer and healthier lives.

The position would involve teaching English to adult immigrants at a pre-basic, basic or intermediate level. We currently need volunteers for both our 1:30 - 4:00 pm and 6:00 - 8:30 pm time slots, as little as once a week. No lesson planning is needed as all the materials will be prepared and supplied to you, and all assessment will be marked by your coordinator. We are happy to train those with no experience and supply training workshops to volunteers several times a year.

Contact Melissa at melissamckinnon@immigrant-education.ca or give us a call at 403-235-3666 if you're interested in joining the CIES team.






Thursday, June 2, 2016

June is National Aboriginal Awareness Month

June is Aboriginal Awareness Month and every June Canadians are invited to celebrate the contributions of Indigenous people, along with their long and storied history in Canada, by taking part in events and festivities.

Settlement agencies, often the first point of contact for newcomers to Canada, have a responsibility to communicate the history of our country and Aboriginal Awareness Month offers an opportunity to kick-start support for efforts aimed at ending cycles of systemic stereotyping and discrimination faced by Aboriginal people through culturally appropriate education on indigenous issues, along with meaningful partnerships that seek the creation of alliances to build awareness within the immigrant community and beyond.

Declared in 2009, National Aboriginal Awareness Month is a time to acknowledge the role Indigenous peoples played in the development of Canada, to honour Indigenous heritage and to celebrate Indigenous cultures. It is also an opportunity to reflect on the strength of present day First Nation, M├ętis and Inuit communities, and their hopes for the future.

Events invite us to learn more about Indigenous history, perspectives and culture, and help us build stronger relationships rooted in mutual respect and understanding. It means that during June, Aboriginal history is brought to the forefront in Canada. It is a month for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people to reflect upon the past and look towards the future.  For Canada, this is the foundation for lasting reconciliation.

A timeline of how this important month in Canada's yearly calendar came into being can be seen below as well as a schedule of events in Calgary that will run from June 10th to June 24th.


  • 1982: The National Indian Brotherhood (now known as the Assembly of First Nations) called for a creation of a National Aboriginal Solidarity Day on June 21.
  • 1990: The Quebec legislature recognized June 21 as a day to celebrate Aboriginal culture
  • 1995: The Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples recommended a day be designated as National First Peoples Day. The Sacred Assembly, a national conference of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people chaired by the late Elijah Harper, called for a national holiday to celebrate the contributions of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada.
  • 1996: Governor General Romeo LeBlanc proclaimed that National Aboriginal Day would be celebrated June 21 each year. "On June 21st, this year and every year, Canada will honour the native peoples who first brought humanity to this great land," said Leblanc. "And may the first peoples of our past always be full and proud partners in our future."
  • 2008: Prime Minister Harper offered the full apology on behalf of Canadians for the Indian Residential Schools system.
  • 2009: By unanimous motion in Canada’s House of Commons, the month of June was declared National Aboriginal History Month.